Someone Else's Problem  Installation Contemporary, Sydney Contemporary, Carriageworks  10-13 September 2015    Someone Else's Problem  is a mass of seemingly discarded paddles that signify the many people currently seeking refuge from persecution or fleeing from war torn regions around the globe.   The work proposes that under 'Operation Sovereign Borders' Australia renders the current international refugee crisis as 'someone else's problem'.  In denying the rights of these individuals  Australia ignores it's obligations to International treaties on Human Rights. The labelling of asylum seekers as illegals is not only false, but dehumanizes the issue and compounds the problem of alienation.   The work seeks to remind us how lucky we few are to enjoy lives of peaceful opportunity in our home land. The paddle, a symbol of assistance, asks how we can ignore those that are asking for our help, when we have so much to share?  This new work continues to develop themes presented in Seton's past exhibitions by reminding the viewer that behind this highly politicized issue there are individual lives being risked, and that seeking asylum is about the fundamental right to aspire to a better life.  All photos by Mark Pokorny.

Someone Else's Problem
Installation Contemporary, Sydney Contemporary, Carriageworks
10-13 September 2015

Someone Else's Problem is a mass of seemingly discarded paddles that signify the many people currently seeking refuge from persecution or fleeing from war torn regions around the globe. 

The work proposes that under 'Operation Sovereign Borders' Australia renders the current international refugee crisis as 'someone else's problem'.  In denying the rights of these individuals  Australia ignores it's obligations to International treaties on Human Rights. The labelling of asylum seekers as illegals is not only false, but dehumanizes the issue and compounds the problem of alienation. 

The work seeks to remind us how lucky we few are to enjoy lives of peaceful opportunity in our home land. The paddle, a symbol of assistance, asks how we can ignore those that are asking for our help, when we have so much to share?

This new work continues to develop themes presented in Seton's past exhibitions by reminding the viewer that behind this highly politicized issue there are individual lives being risked, and that seeking asylum is about the fundamental right to aspire to a better life.

All photos by Mark Pokorny.

  Someone Else's Problem  2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)

Someone Else's Problem 2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)

  Someone Else's Problem  2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)

Someone Else's Problem 2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)

  Someone Else's Problem  2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)

Someone Else's Problem 2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)

  Someone Else's Problem  2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)

Someone Else's Problem 2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)

  Someone Else's Problem  Installation Contemporary, Sydney Contemporary, Carriageworks  10-13 September 2015    Someone Else's Problem  is a mass of seemingly discarded paddles that signify the many people currently seeking refuge from persecution or fleeing from war torn regions around the globe.   The work proposes that under 'Operation Sovereign Borders' Australia renders the current international refugee crisis as 'someone else's problem'.  In denying the rights of these individuals  Australia ignores it's obligations to International treaties on Human Rights. The labelling of asylum seekers as illegals is not only false, but dehumanizes the issue and compounds the problem of alienation.   The work seeks to remind us how lucky we few are to enjoy lives of peaceful opportunity in our home land. The paddle, a symbol of assistance, asks how we can ignore those that are asking for our help, when we have so much to share?  This new work continues to develop themes presented in Seton's past exhibitions by reminding the viewer that behind this highly politicized issue there are individual lives being risked, and that seeking asylum is about the fundamental right to aspire to a better life.  All photos by Mark Pokorny.
  Someone Else's Problem  2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)
  Someone Else's Problem  2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)
  Someone Else's Problem  2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)
  Someone Else's Problem  2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)

Someone Else's Problem
Installation Contemporary, Sydney Contemporary, Carriageworks
10-13 September 2015

Someone Else's Problem is a mass of seemingly discarded paddles that signify the many people currently seeking refuge from persecution or fleeing from war torn regions around the globe. 

The work proposes that under 'Operation Sovereign Borders' Australia renders the current international refugee crisis as 'someone else's problem'.  In denying the rights of these individuals  Australia ignores it's obligations to International treaties on Human Rights. The labelling of asylum seekers as illegals is not only false, but dehumanizes the issue and compounds the problem of alienation. 

The work seeks to remind us how lucky we few are to enjoy lives of peaceful opportunity in our home land. The paddle, a symbol of assistance, asks how we can ignore those that are asking for our help, when we have so much to share?

This new work continues to develop themes presented in Seton's past exhibitions by reminding the viewer that behind this highly politicized issue there are individual lives being risked, and that seeking asylum is about the fundamental right to aspire to a better life.

All photos by Mark Pokorny.

Someone Else's Problem 2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)

Someone Else's Problem 2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)

Someone Else's Problem 2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)

Someone Else's Problem 2015, marble dust, resin, Tasmanian oak, stainless steel, LED lights, dimensions variable (installation view)

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